On this page:
1.1 Important Dates
1.2 Overview
1.3 Submission Requirements
1.4 Submission Site
1.5 Previous Proceedings
1.6 Acknowledgement

1 Call for Papers

1.1 Important Dates

The dates are still being finalized. Tentative dates:

Submission deadline: Feb 14, 2019 (Anywhere On Earth) [FIRM]
Decisions announced: Mar 15, 2019
Final versions due: Apr 15, 2019
Conference: May 15-17, 2019

1.2 Overview

SNAPL focuses on experience-based insight, innovation, and visionary ideas spanning from foundations to applications of programming languages. We welcome perspectives from both industry and academia.

SNAPL defines itself in opposition to conventional conferences. Papers with traditional results that could have been published at a conventional conference or workshop will automatically be rejected, no matter how good the result. In contrast, papers that would not easily find a home at conventional venues are very welcome here. These might include:
  • visionary ideas requiring years of exploration and evaluation,

  • progress on an ongoing, long term research program,

  • lessons from a completed project (including design mistakes!),

  • well-argued challenges to accepted ideas and methods,

  • an unexpected connection between two areas of programming languages, or

  • a new line of research that builds off of other areas of Computer Science or other disciplines.

Naturally, this list is not exclusive. In sum, submissions must lead to a stimulating, thoughtful, or even (gently) provocative discussion. Looking at the Previous Proceedings may help. (Essentially, imagine that you are applying for an invitation to give a good keynote speech.)

SNAPL especially welcomes submissions by practitioners. They often have difficulty presenting their work in the narrow format expected by traditional conferences. In contrast, SNAPL’s openness of format and emphasis on discussion should make it an attractive venue for them.

1.3 Submission Requirements

Because SNAPL depends on presentation and discussion, attending authors are expected to be good presenters and engaged participants. Authors who attend are expected to stay for the entire event and participate fully in discussion of papers other than their own.

SNAPL submissions are not anonymized. We are interested, for instance, in hearing from researchers who have conducted a particular project, or built a particular language or system, over many years, and want to provide their personal insights. In such cases, the identity of the author is very relevant: the perspective of a creator is very different from that of an outsider. As such, it is essentially meaningless to try to anonymize such a paper.

Submissions must be formatted using the LIPIcs style. Authors really must follow this style, and it will save Dagstuhl staff, the publications chair, and authors considerable pain to do so from the start. Therefore, papers not formatted in this style will be automatically rejected.

The initial paper should be a minimum of five and maximum of eight pages, including supplements but excluding the bibliography in the LIPics style. (That corresponds to 3–5 pages in ACM styles.) Final contributions can be up to sixteen pages in length (including supplements, excluding bibliography).

(Why the stark difference in lengths? Reviewers often ask for more content, and it’s a bad use of authors’ time to determine what to cut to make room for additional material. Authors may also want to include additional results, supplementary material, etc. At the same time, reviewer time is valuable, and we believe a good SNAPL contribution can make its central point snappily; if it can’t do so in 5–8 pages, it’s unlikely 16 pages will help.)

Note: Due to the current LIPIcs style, the author/affiliation block can take a significant amount of space. While we need to conform to the requirements of LIPIcs for the final submission, you are welcome to creatively reformat this block for your submission to minimize space usage.

1.4 Submission Site

Please submit through HotCRP.

1.5 Previous Proceedings

The proceedings volume of SNAPL 2019 will be published in the LIPIcs series by Dagstuhl. For reference, you can peruse the proceedings from SNAPL 2017 and SNAPL 2015.

1.6 Acknowledgement

SNAPL draws on the best elements of many successful meeting formats, including the database community’s CIDR conference; NSPW in security; the various Hot* conferences in systems; the practitioner-leaning Strange Loop; Seminars hosted at Dagstuhl; Working Groups run by IFIP; and *PLS regional programming language events.